Editorial

Western Europe 1930s – 1960s in total misery…

Paul Almásy (Budapest, 1906 – Paris, 2003) compiled photos of all people and all classes, including the various ethnic and social marginal groups.

Below you can see dramatic photos of the Gypsies in Europe, Netherlands, from the 1930s to the 1960s, which we are accustomed to only from Romania, Bulgaria or Yugoslavia.

So, did they live in so archaic conditions in Western Europe even only two generations ago? Nothing just misery, poverty and much more…

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Editorial

The gypsies of Josef Koudelka´s

ROMANIA.-1968.

Josef Koudelka is a photographer, born in Moravia, Czech Republic. Some of the subjects of his photographs were gypsies.

Koudelka started photographing gypsies in 1962, recording with his camera the life of the gypsy community of Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, Romania, Hungary, France and Spain. He had met the gypsies for the first time as a young boy at a music folk festival and what struck him was their music and passion.

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1971-Grenade

1976-Portugal

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Editorial

Memorial to the Sinti and Roma

Memorial to the Sinti and Roma

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The memorial, designed by the Israeli artist Dani Karavan, is a circular pool of water with a triangular concrete plinth at its centre, on which a fresh flower is to be placed each day.

The words of Auschwitz, a poem by Italian Santino Spinelli, are formed in the metal surround of the pool in German:

Eingefallenes Gesicht, erloschene Augen, kalte Lippen. Stille. Ein zerissenes Herz, ohne Atem, ohne Worte, keine Tränen.
and English:

Pallid face, dead eyes, cold lips. Silence. A broken heart without breath, without words, no tears.

Violin music, at times almost imperceptible, plays in the background and seems to bounce around the clearing in which the memorial is located.

Partly surrounding the site is an opaque glass wall with a timeline tracing the genocide.

The memorial has its own protracted history. The suffering of the Sinti and Roma people was not officially recognised by the German government until the then Chancellor, Helmut Schmidt, did so in 1982, 37 years after the end of the war.

A further ten years passed before it was agreed in 1992 that a monument should be erected and a decision on its location wasn’t made until 2001.

There were then more delays while the Central Council of German Sinti and Roma debated the wording to be associated with the memorial, particularly the possible use of the term ‘gypsy’.

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Editorial

23 Years since comunism has ended in Romania

Is December, and 23 years ago I learned the Romanian dictator was on the run. A movie that at my age of 12 was real. Few days ago, after a good search on the Romanian revolution I came across these great pictures. Reason why I would like to share them with you.

The Romanian Revolution of 1989 was a week-long series of increasingly violent riots and fighting in late December 1989 that overthrew the Government of Nicolae Ceausescu.

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