Editorial

Western Europe 1930s – 1960s in total misery…

Paul Almásy (Budapest, 1906 – Paris, 2003) compiled photos of all people and all classes, including the various ethnic and social marginal groups.

Below you can see dramatic photos of the Gypsies in Europe, Netherlands, from the 1930s to the 1960s, which we are accustomed to only from Romania, Bulgaria or Yugoslavia.

So, did they live in so archaic conditions in Western Europe even only two generations ago? Nothing just misery, poverty and much more…

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Editorial

The gypsies of Josef Koudelka´s

ROMANIA.-1968.

Josef Koudelka is a photographer, born in Moravia, Czech Republic. Some of the subjects of his photographs were gypsies.

Koudelka started photographing gypsies in 1962, recording with his camera the life of the gypsy community of Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, Romania, Hungary, France and Spain. He had met the gypsies for the first time as a young boy at a music folk festival and what struck him was their music and passion.

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1971-Grenade

1976-Portugal

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Video

Bulgaria, Romania End Up with Wrong Flags in BBC Immigration Debate

An embarrassing blunder was made during a BBC Daily Politics show, as Bulgaria and Romania appeared with wrong flags.

The blunder was made during an open border immigration debate featuring Nigel Farage – UKIP, Mark Harper – Conservative, and Owen Smith – Labour.

During the debate, a map was displayed picturing Bulgaria’s flag over Romania’s territory – and vice versa.
Polls commissioned by the BBC in Bulgaria and Romania recently showed that there is no great likelihood that Britain will be flooded with migrants from the two Balkan countries once work restrictions fall off at the end of 2013.

Controversial claims have been made by a number of British tabloids and politicians that the UK should brace for a massive”influx” of Bulgarian and Romanian migrants after the end of 2013. It has been claimed that lifting the restriction would “put pressure” on housing, infrastructure, schools, and heath care.

Among the main reasons for the “migrant scare” was a perception that Eastern European migrants would simply drain Britain’s welfare system.

 

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Unwanted, marginalised, defiant – the Roma people have become the target of governments across Europe. In France and Italy they have been thrown out in their thousands – accused of illegally overstaying their welcome and blamed for increases in crime. They say that in their countries of origin they are victims of discrimination – a minority with few opportunities. They are now taking advantage of European Union laws that allow freedom of travel to all European citizens – looking West to find a better life, yet reluctant to adapt to Western ways. The Roma issue has now been forced on EU policy makers – they have to find a balance between the growing hostility and the rights of the Roma.